HERE0:5

Cancer

Acupuncture at the Si Guan Xue shown to be a powerful pain relief treatment for cancer patients
Acupuncture could be used as an effective treatment for cancer pain. A study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine tested which acupoints would provide the most relief for cancer patients from cancer pain. Acupuncture has been proven effective against different kinds of body pain. The researchers recruited 42 patients going through... Read More [...]
7
Like
Save
She Never Thought She’d Get a Tattoo Here — But She Didn’t Think She’d Lose a Breast to Cancer Either
Maia was a healthy and active young mother of two—not a likely candidate for breast cancer. But she developed it anyway and had to have a single mastectomy and radiotherapy to get rid of it. Since then, she’s felt like her scar is a constant reminder of something she wishes she could forget. Maia had an implant put in, but she never thought it looked or felt like a natural breast, and she wasn’t happy with it or its impact on her body image. So after a couple of years, she had that removed and was again left with just the empty indent where her real breast used to be, punctuated by an ugly scar. Three and a half years after the life-altering change cancer made to her body, Maia decided to do something else she never thought she’d do—get a tattoo. “The only people that have seen my scars are the doctors and consultants and my husband,” says Maia. But she bravely removed her top for the cameras in preparation for the tattoo she hoped would change how she felt about her body. Tattoo artist Poppy helped Maia work on a design that would be flowy, feminine, and beautiful to cover the scar on her chest. Then she set to work making the design a reality. And when it came time for the final reveal? Continue reading ... http://blog.thebreastcancersite.com/maia-tattoo/ [...]
1
Like
Save
Breast Cancer And Supplements: 7 Things You Should Know Before Popping Pills
Do you supplement? Some folks are true believers when it comes to vitamins and supplements and know the ins and outs of every bottle in the health-food aisle. Others think that supplements are useless and do little more than trick people into paying $24.99 for a bottle of modern-day snake oil. And many, perhaps the majority, are somewhere in the middle trying to stay healthy without going broke. For people going through breast cancer treatment, nutrition is especially important. You want to give your body everything it could possibly need. A cancer patient may be more motivated to try supplements, but at the same time be hesitant to take anything that might compromise treatment. There’s a lot of information out there, and it can be overwhelming to sort through. Before opening up an account at your local health food store, check out our seven basic guidelines for evaluating how, or if, to use vitamins and supplements. You’ll be less likely to waste time and money if you keep these tips in mind: 1. THE MORE OUTRAGEOUS A CLAIM… The more likely it is to be false, or at least misconstrued. The more sensationalized something sounds, the less likely it is to be 100 percent true. Sometimes we hear incredible claims from people or sources that we sincerely trust, but remember that proper context counts for a lot, and one person’s results does not equal universal truth. Sometimes you’ll find information based on a nugget of truth, but blown out of proportion so much that it’s no longer valid. Try to find additional, well-respected sources to corroborate claims. Remember that breastcancer.org (and every other reputable source we’ve checked) says that there aren’t any supplements that can treat or cure cancer. For more information on how to evaluate internet health claims, check out this article. 2. VITAMINS AND SUPPLEMENTS ARE REGULATED DIFFERENTLY THAN DRUGS The FDA tests and approves both over-the-counter and prescription medications in the US, but vitamins and supplements are not regulated. The manufacturers of dietary supplements are responsible for evaluating the safety and efficacy of their products. The FDA will take action if a product is found to be mislabeled or unsafe after it reaches the market. 3. IT’S STILL BEST TO GET MOST OF OUR NUTRITION FROM FOOD In a best-case scenario, we would meet all our needs for vitamins and minerals through a healthy, nutrient-dense diet. Nutrients are generally best absorbed when they are consumed in their whole-food form, and if you are getting a healthy diet extra supplements may simply be a waste of money. There are times when nutrition needs can’t be met through diet alone, and it’s those cases when supplements may be helpful. 4. NATURAL DOES NOT ALWAYS EQUAL SAFE Poison oak is natural. Some arsenic occurs naturally in soil. It doesn’t mean that we want to go around brewing these things into a new-fangled elixir. That’s not to say that consuming more natural products is a bad idea, but be aware that sometimes the word “natural” is more a marketing tactic than anything else. According to breastcancer.org , the most important question to ask is not “Is this natural?” but “Will this benefit my health?”   Continue reading.. Breast Cancer And Supplements [...]
5
Like
Save
How can you cope with a cancer diagnosis?
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer is one of the most widespread diseases worldwide. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimates that, in the United States alone, there were approximately 1,685,210 new cases of cancer in 2016. What are some practical ways that could help you to cope with the shock of a cancer diagnosis, and allow you to make the best decisions for yourself? Medical News Today has spoken with healthcare professionals and explored the experiences of people living with cancer with the aim of bringing you advice on how to face this unwelcome news. 'Make sure you understand your diagnosis' Getting diagnosed with cancer comes as a shock to anyone, but one important way of coping with it is to be well informed. Cancer is often surrounded by an aura of myth, and much of what we think we know about it can be based on hearsay. So, an important first step is to get as much (specific) information as possible, from both your doctor and other reliable sources. Dany Bell — a specialist advisor on treatment and recovery at Macmillan Cancer Support, based in the United Kingdom — told MNT, "Being diagnosed with cancer can be a big shock, even if you already suspected you might have it." "Cancer is a word that can stir up many fears and emotions," adds Bell, "but making sure you fully understand your diagnosis can help you feel more in control of the situation."   Continue reading.. Coping with a Cancer Diagnosis.   [...]
6
Like
Save
Could oral sex raise your head and neck cancer risk?
New research has discovered that smoking and oral sex are tied to an increased risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer, which is a form of head and neck cancer activated by exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV).Although the risk is increased, it is still low; only 0.7 percent of men are ever likely developing oropharyngeal cancer during their lifetimes, according to the new study.The risk of developing the condition was found to be considerably lower among women, non-smokers, and those who had had fewer than five partners with whom they had performed oral sex.Prof. Gypsyamber D'Souza, of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Dr. Carole Fakhry, of the Johns Hopkins Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery — both of which are located in Baltimore, MD — conducted the research. Their results have been published in the journal Annals of Oncology.Every year in the United States, there are approximately 16,500 cases of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, which is the most common type of oropharyngeal cancer. More than 11,500 of these are HPV-related. More than 100 different types of HPV exist, but only a few of these are known to cause cancer. HPV16 or 18, for example, triggers most cases of cervical cancer, and HPV16 is known to cause most oropharyngeal cancers. Experts have predicted that by 2020, the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer will overtake that of cervical cancer."For these reasons," says Prof. D'Souza, "it would be useful to be able to identify healthy people who are most at risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer in order to inform potential screening strategies, if effective screening tests could be developed."She adds, "Most people perform oral sex in their lives, and we found that oral infection with cancer-causing HPV was rare among women regardless of how many oral sex partners they had.""Among men who did not smoke," Prof. D'Souza says, "cancer-causing oral HPV was rare among everyone who had less than five oral sex partners, although the chances of having oral HPV infection did increase with number of oral sexual partners, and with smoking."The study data came from 13,089 individuals, all of whom were aged 20–69 years old, who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.The participants had all been tested for oral HPV infection. To predict the risk of oropharyngeal cancer from oral HPV infection, the researchers used data on oropharyngeal cancer cases and deaths from U.S. registries. Smoking and oral sex partners elevate risk Prof. D'Souza and Dr. Fakhry found the lowest prevalence of oral infection with cancer-causing forms of HPV in women who had had one or no oral sex partners during their lifetimes. Of these, 1.8 percent were smokers and 0.5 percent were non-smokers. The risk of infection climbed slightly to 1.5 percent for women who had had two to more oral sex partners. Among men, those who had had one or no oral sex partners were at the lowest risk, with a prevalence of 1.5 percent for oral HPV infection. Among men with two to four oral sex partners, prevalence increased to 4 percent among non-smokers and elevated further to 7.1 percent among men who smoked. Non-smoking men who had had five or more oral sex partners had a prevalence of oral HPV infection of 7.4 percent. The highest prevalence of infection — reaching 15 percent — was observed among men with five or more oral sex partners and who smoked. Continue reading.. Could oral sex raise your head and neck cancer risk? [...]
6
Like
Save
How blueberries help to kill cancer cells
Researchers suggest that the success of radiation therapy against cancer cells could be increased significantly, thanks to blueberries. [...]
7
Like
Save
Vaginal bacteria may have a role in cervical cancer
The composition of bacteria in the vagina could be an important factor in the development of cervical cancer, according to a recent study. Infection with some particular strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-known risk for cervical cancer. However, researchers at the University of Arizona in Phoenix suggest that other factors may also be relevant because of their influence on the condition of the cervix. A paper now published in the journal Scientific Reports describes how they found that women with cancer or precancer of the cervix had different vaginal bacteria to women who did not have cervical tissue abnormalities. The finding suggests that there might be a direct link between "good" bacteria and a healthy cervix, and "bad" bacteria and raised risk for cervical cancer. "In cancer and precancer patients," explains senior study author Melissa M. Herbst-Kralovetz, who is an associate professor in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, "lactobacilli — good bacteria — are replaced by a mixture of bad bacteria." Cervical cancer and HPV Cervical cancer starts when cells in the cervix, or the entrance to the uterus from the vagina, grow abnormally and become a tumor. The presence of abnormal cells is known as precancer. If the abnormal cells become cancer cells and spread into neighboring tissue, it becomes cervical cancer. Precancerous tissue should "be removed" to prevent cancer. This can normally be done without harming unaffected tissue. Estimates for the United States suggest that, "at some point during their lifetime," approximately 0.6 percent of women will be told that they have cervical cancer. New cases of cervical cancer in the U.S. dropped by at least 50 percent in 1975–2010 and statistics for 2008–2014 show that more than 66 percent of women survive for more than 5 years after diagnosis. HPV spreads through "intimate skin-to-skin contact," such as during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. There are more than 150 types of HPV, of which only some can give rise to cancer in men and women. Usually, the immune system can clear the virus without causing any harm. But if the virus persists, it can cause genital warts and cancer. In both sexes, HPVs can cause cancer of the mouth, throat, anus, and rectum. In men, they can also cause cancer of the penis. In women, HPVs can cause cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva.   Continue reading.. Vaginal bacteria may have a role in cervical cancer.   [...]
2
Like
Save
Check Out Warung Cikgu For Hearty No-Frills Nasi Mmanggey
It is an irresistible combination of fluffy hot-from-the-steamer rice drizzled with gulai ayam and served with easy-to-eat pieces of juicy fried turmeric chicken and burn-your-tongue-off sambal belacan that draws people to Warung Cikgu in Puchong. Started in May 2005, the eatery was set up by Kelantan native Ariff Suqimi and managing the two outlets is Ariff’s primary school friend and fellow Kelantanese, Nik Mohd Faiz, 28. The name of the place pays tribute to Ariff’s father who is popularly known as Cikgu Karim, a nod to his profession. This January, they expanded and opened another outlet in USJ1’s Regalia Business Centre. What they serve here is nasi Mmanggey which is actually different from the other Kelantanese favourite nasi Kak Wok. Confused because both dishes look identical? Can’t say we blame you as they are both feature fried chicken. Nik Mohd Faiz tells us there are slight differences between the two rice dishes that trace their origins back to Kelantan. He adds, “The concept is the same but the taste is different.” For nasi Mmanggey, the fried chicken is marinated with turmeric powder, chilli powder and salt while the nasi Kak Wok chicken uses a marinade made from fresh turmeric. In terms of spice levels for the sambal belacan accompanying the rice, Nik Mohd Faiz explains to us that they increased the spiciness. In Kelantan, nasi Mmanggey (RM5.50) is usually eaten for breakfast and lunch. At Warung Cikgu, you get to satisfy your cravings for the rice dish throughout the day. Accompany your meal with their kelapa baldi (RM4.20) or fresh coconut water served in a small bucket. Nik Mohd Faiz tells us the coconuts are sourced from Bagan Datoh in Perak. You also have Shake!Gu (RM3.70), their version of coconut shake with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The word gu is Kelantanese slang for buddy.If you’re early, look for their breakfast items which are available till 10am. A must-try is the nasi lemak biasa (RM2.70). Simple but satisfying; the fluffy rice is delicious when paired with the fragrant, not too spicy sambal and crunchy deep fried ikan bilis. [...]
7
Like
Save
Cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease: Is THIS trendy spice really a miracle cure?
CANCER and Alzheimer’s disease are just two of the conditions it’s been claimed turmeric - a yellow spice traditionally used in curries, and in recent times lattes - can successfully treat. But there are suggestions its benefits may be unfounded. Turmeric is from the yurmeric root and is native to Southeast Asia. It has been revered in recent months for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Its hype seems to have been backed up by a cohort of studies - indeed just last week research revealed that a chemical it contains, curcumin, may be the key to a new cancer. However, there are claims that consuming the spice, used for centuries in Indian and Chinese cooking, on a regular basis may do little more than add flavour. A ground-breaking study, unveiled earlier this year, revealed that as far as current evidence stands, it doesn’t live up to the hype, and has few - if any - health benefits. The research, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, involved a review of scientific literature on curcumin. Study authors believe the findings weren’t always translated correctly by the media, but their claims have driven turmeric to become the latest healthy buzzword. Michael Walters, co-author and research associate professor at the University of Minnesota, said: “Once something enters the popular press, it can be blown out of proportion. “These studies have become a part of folklore, and their actual results don’t really measure up to what they’re quoted as.” As well as research that had conflicts of interest - such as researchers who might benefit from sales of turmeric - they weren’t able to find any double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, known as the gold-standard of medical research, on the spice. Despite the review’s findings, it’s easy to see why the details may have been overlooked - previous research revealed some very appealing benefits. It was found that curcumin could reduce levels of cytokines which produce inflammation and have been linked to the development of conditions such as obesity. Additionally, other studies have found curcumin is beneficial for preventing insulin resistance, improving high blood sugar and reducing the toxic effects of high blood glucose levels - meaning it could help diabetes. The same chemical was also found by - albeit mostly animal - studies to improve heart health. It’s also been claimed to be a defence against cancer. While lab and animal testing supports this, there is currently a lack of evidence in humans. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, lab-based studies have shown curcumin’s ability to break down amyloid-beta plaques, however they say there is no real evidence it can treat the disease. [...]
5
Like
Save
Turmeric is a potential aid against precancerous cells
It does more than flavor your curry. It could potentially save your life. Turmeric may kill precancerous cells, and is deservedly the newest superfood to hit the market by storm. I’ve chronicled my experience consuming turmeric regularly over the period of three weeks. After reaping some profound benefits, I swear by its mystic powers. I am a big believer in natural remedies and earthly elements as a means of health betterment. No, I’m not one of those health fanatics with an unappetizing meal plan and rigorous exercise regimen. On the contrary. For those readers who know me through my work, you know that I am someone who lacks motivation when it comes to fitness, so naturally, I’m also the person for whom doctors visits and dental appointments are difficult commitments. I have the luxury of a relaxed approach to my health, but it’s one of those aspects of oneself that required diligence and nurturing. I think it’s because of my tumultuous relationship with healthcare that I often seek holistic (but safe) remedies for many transient ailments. I will try just about anything I can get my hands on to avoid unbearably long waiting rooms to see the doctor. Apparently, I’m not the only one. Turmeric is touted for its benefits on cancer prevention. Cancer affects one in every three people, and is a big diagnosis to swallow. But it comes with a ton of skepticism. I mean, how can a spice seem to have eluded so much medical literature? [...]
2
Like
Save
Curcumin Compound in Turmeric May be Used to Help Fight Cancer in Children
Turmeric is a commonly found condiment in Indian households and has also long been known for its health benefits. Here's another reason to add it to your daily diet, especially in your child's meal. Turmeric is a commonly found condiment in Indian households and has also long been known for its health benefits. Here's another reason to add it to your daily diet, especially in your child's meals. A team of scientists from the United States of America have found that a bioactive compound in turmeric known as curcumin can also cure cancer in children. Neuroblastoma is one of the most common cancers in children below the age of five years. The cancer starts in early nerve cells and commonly forms in the tissue of the adrenal glands, near the kidneys. It is also associated with developmental delays, hearing loss and other disabilities. Researchers at Nemours Children's Hospital and the University of Central Florida (UCF) have recently found that the nanoparticles loaded with curcumin can offer a novel treatment to target and destroy neuroblastoma tumor cells. In the study, researchers attached curcumin to cerium oxide nanoparticles and tested the nano-curcumin formulation in cell-lines of a high-risk form of neuroblastoma. [...]
5
Like
Save
Does turmeric really help protect us from cancer?
Over the years numerous articles have appeared claiming that turmeric is able to cure anything from heartburn to an upset stomach, and keep at bay serious diseases like diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, and even cancer. A regular diet of modest amounts of turmeric give us any health benefits or should we be taking supplements packed with turmeric or curcumin to ward off disease? [...]
3
Like
Save