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Cancer

Breast Cancer: A-Z Mindful Practices: Self Care Tools For Treatment & Recovery
Breast Cancer: A-Z Mindful Practices will uplift, inspire and encourage you as you navigate this new chapter in your life, living with breast cancer. The days get long and the decisions are endless. The wait is often terrifying and certainly frustrating. Your attention span is short and your time is invaded with doctor’s appointments, lab tests, and possible surgeries. Astonishingly, you seem to be the only one with a sense of urgency. All the while discovering the “unique” ways your family and friends show their support. It is an exercise in grace to say the least. So here is a book, a small and simple gift written with your struggles in mind. It starts with Abundance and ends with Zest, and all of the words in-between. It is our hope these words through the alphabet will help you focus, make decisions, and encourage you to put one foot in front of the other. Sometimes it is the simplest of inspirations that keep our head above water. Additionally, there are short reflections written to direct your attention and thoughts into a positive space when negative emotions abound. Each word, crafted with the idea that you need a lifesaver, becomes a buoy, something to hold on to when the shoreline has drifted away. Click Here For More Information [...]
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Check Out Warung Cikgu For Hearty No-Frills Nasi Mmanggey
It is an irresistible combination of fluffy hot-from-the-steamer rice drizzled with gulai ayam and served with easy-to-eat pieces of juicy fried turmeric chicken and burn-your-tongue-off sambal belacan that draws people to Warung Cikgu in Puchong. Started in May 2005, the eatery was set up by Kelantan native Ariff Suqimi and managing the two outlets is Ariff’s primary school friend and fellow Kelantanese, Nik Mohd Faiz, 28. The name of the place pays tribute to Ariff’s father who is popularly known as Cikgu Karim, a nod to his profession. This January, they expanded and opened another outlet in USJ1’s Regalia Business Centre. What they serve here is nasi Mmanggey which is actually different from the other Kelantanese favourite nasi Kak Wok. Confused because both dishes look identical? Can’t say we blame you as they are both feature fried chicken. Nik Mohd Faiz tells us there are slight differences between the two rice dishes that trace their origins back to Kelantan. He adds, “The concept is the same but the taste is different.” For nasi Mmanggey, the fried chicken is marinated with turmeric powder, chilli powder and salt while the nasi Kak Wok chicken uses a marinade made from fresh turmeric. In terms of spice levels for the sambal belacan accompanying the rice, Nik Mohd Faiz explains to us that they increased the spiciness. In Kelantan, nasi Mmanggey (RM5.50) is usually eaten for breakfast and lunch. At Warung Cikgu, you get to satisfy your cravings for the rice dish throughout the day. Accompany your meal with their kelapa baldi (RM4.20) or fresh coconut water served in a small bucket. Nik Mohd Faiz tells us the coconuts are sourced from Bagan Datoh in Perak. You also have Shake!Gu (RM3.70), their version of coconut shake with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The word gu is Kelantanese slang for buddy.If you’re early, look for their breakfast items which are available till 10am. A must-try is the nasi lemak biasa (RM2.70). Simple but satisfying; the fluffy rice is delicious when paired with the fragrant, not too spicy sambal and crunchy deep fried ikan bilis. [...]
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Cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease: Is THIS trendy spice really a miracle cure?
CANCER and Alzheimer’s disease are just two of the conditions it’s been claimed turmeric - a yellow spice traditionally used in curries, and in recent times lattes - can successfully treat. But there are suggestions its benefits may be unfounded. Turmeric is from the yurmeric root and is native to Southeast Asia. It has been revered in recent months for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Its hype seems to have been backed up by a cohort of studies - indeed just last week research revealed that a chemical it contains, curcumin, may be the key to a new cancer. However, there are claims that consuming the spice, used for centuries in Indian and Chinese cooking, on a regular basis may do little more than add flavour. A ground-breaking study, unveiled earlier this year, revealed that as far as current evidence stands, it doesn’t live up to the hype, and has few - if any - health benefits. The research, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, involved a review of scientific literature on curcumin. Study authors believe the findings weren’t always translated correctly by the media, but their claims have driven turmeric to become the latest healthy buzzword. Michael Walters, co-author and research associate professor at the University of Minnesota, said: “Once something enters the popular press, it can be blown out of proportion. “These studies have become a part of folklore, and their actual results don’t really measure up to what they’re quoted as.” As well as research that had conflicts of interest - such as researchers who might benefit from sales of turmeric - they weren’t able to find any double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, known as the gold-standard of medical research, on the spice. Despite the review’s findings, it’s easy to see why the details may have been overlooked - previous research revealed some very appealing benefits. It was found that curcumin could reduce levels of cytokines which produce inflammation and have been linked to the development of conditions such as obesity. Additionally, other studies have found curcumin is beneficial for preventing insulin resistance, improving high blood sugar and reducing the toxic effects of high blood glucose levels - meaning it could help diabetes. The same chemical was also found by - albeit mostly animal - studies to improve heart health. It’s also been claimed to be a defence against cancer. While lab and animal testing supports this, there is currently a lack of evidence in humans. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, lab-based studies have shown curcumin’s ability to break down amyloid-beta plaques, however they say there is no real evidence it can treat the disease. [...]
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Turmeric is a potential aid against precancerous cells
It does more than flavor your curry. It could potentially save your life. Turmeric may kill precancerous cells, and is deservedly the newest superfood to hit the market by storm. I’ve chronicled my experience consuming turmeric regularly over the period of three weeks. After reaping some profound benefits, I swear by its mystic powers. I am a big believer in natural remedies and earthly elements as a means of health betterment. No, I’m not one of those health fanatics with an unappetizing meal plan and rigorous exercise regimen. On the contrary. For those readers who know me through my work, you know that I am someone who lacks motivation when it comes to fitness, so naturally, I’m also the person for whom doctors visits and dental appointments are difficult commitments. I have the luxury of a relaxed approach to my health, but it’s one of those aspects of oneself that required diligence and nurturing. I think it’s because of my tumultuous relationship with healthcare that I often seek holistic (but safe) remedies for many transient ailments. I will try just about anything I can get my hands on to avoid unbearably long waiting rooms to see the doctor. Apparently, I’m not the only one. Turmeric is touted for its benefits on cancer prevention. Cancer affects one in every three people, and is a big diagnosis to swallow. But it comes with a ton of skepticism. I mean, how can a spice seem to have eluded so much medical literature? [...]
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Curcumin Compound in Turmeric May be Used to Help Fight Cancer in Children
Turmeric is a commonly found condiment in Indian households and has also long been known for its health benefits. Here's another reason to add it to your daily diet, especially in your child's meal. Turmeric is a commonly found condiment in Indian households and has also long been known for its health benefits. Here's another reason to add it to your daily diet, especially in your child's meals. A team of scientists from the United States of America have found that a bioactive compound in turmeric known as curcumin can also cure cancer in children. Neuroblastoma is one of the most common cancers in children below the age of five years. The cancer starts in early nerve cells and commonly forms in the tissue of the adrenal glands, near the kidneys. It is also associated with developmental delays, hearing loss and other disabilities. Researchers at Nemours Children's Hospital and the University of Central Florida (UCF) have recently found that the nanoparticles loaded with curcumin can offer a novel treatment to target and destroy neuroblastoma tumor cells. In the study, researchers attached curcumin to cerium oxide nanoparticles and tested the nano-curcumin formulation in cell-lines of a high-risk form of neuroblastoma. [...]
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Does turmeric really help protect us from cancer?
Over the years numerous articles have appeared claiming that turmeric is able to cure anything from heartburn to an upset stomach, and keep at bay serious diseases like diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, and even cancer. A regular diet of modest amounts of turmeric give us any health benefits or should we be taking supplements packed with turmeric or curcumin to ward off disease? [...]
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The Effects of Turmeric Curcumin on Pancreatic Cancer Patients
In 2010 I profiled a study conducted by the National Institutes of Health, the largest such study in history, which found that dietary fat of animal origin was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk. Which animal fat is the worst? The second ... [...]
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Curcumin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Metastases
Curcumin, an ingredient of the Indian spice Turmeric, has been shown to stop the formation of metastases in prostate cancer patients, researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, Germany, reported in the journal Carcinogenesis today. [...]
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Kim Vaillancourt who delayed cancer treatments to save unborn child gives birth
A pregnant mother who delayed cancer treatment to protect her unborn child has given birth. Kim Vaillancourt, 36, of Tonawanda, New York, was diagnosed with glioblastoma - a form of brain cancer - over Christmas when she was five months into her ... [...]
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Gentlemen, Know Thy Nuts (To Check For Testicular Cancer)
"Testicular cancer is not very common," Dr. Vesprini says. It affects about 1,500 men per year in Canada. Although it can happen at any age, it is most common in young men -- peaking between the ages of 20 and 40 years old. For reasons not yet known ... [...]
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Why Tommy Archer Stopped Taking Medication for Prostate Cancer – And Why It Worked
Tommy Archer: Just the fact that if I took the medicine for depression, I couldn't drive a race car. Dr. Gupta: And Tommy wanted to get back on the track. So after two years of hormone therapy, he and his doctors decided to take a chance and bring his ... [...]
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Breakthrough: Experts reveal blood test can detect spread of breast cancer
Secondary breast cancer is difficult to diagnose before symptoms are experienced and it occurs in up to a third of breast cancer patients, sometimes many years after seemingly successful treatment for localised, primary cancer that remained in the breast. [...]
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